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The work of the Victorian cemetery photographer consisted of lugging around a huge camera on a sturdy wooden tripod, and framing the shot with his head under a black cloth, so he could see the dim upside-down image on the ground glass viewing screen. Once he was satisfied he would close the shutter and insert a delicate glass or metal plate, coated with light sensitive material, into the camera. He would then settle down for a two or three minute exposure. Finally, back to the darkroom, where chemical processes quite different to today's would be used, to produce the final print. These are some examples we found in the archives.


Not really - these photographs were taken with a modern digital camera in very recent times and post-processed to provide the same or certainly similar effects.

This is Kensal Green again, with some of the colour photographs you saw in the other Kensal album, and some different ones.












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